Connect with us

Politics

South Sudan president announces new parliament

South Sudan leader Kiir decrees new parliament

Published

on

By AFP


Advertisement

Published: May 11, 2021 07:13 PM

South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir announced a new parliament on Monday including lawmakers from opposing sides of the country’s civil war as part of a 2018 peace accord, state television reported.


Advertisement

A new legislative body was a condition of the 2018 accord between himself and Vice President Riek Machar, for years on opposition sides during the five-year civil war that left 380,000 people dead and four million displaced.

“Reconstituting” the country’s parliament had been due in February 2020, but had still not taken place, prompting the ire of the opposition. 


Advertisement

Kiir dissolved the previous parliament on Saturday ahead of the change.

A decree by Kiir was then read out on the South Sudan Broadcasting Corporation on Monday, including the names of the national assembly legislators. In accordance with the accord, the new assembly will number 550 lawmakers, up from the previous 400.


Advertisement

Of these 332 deputies were chosen by Kiir, 128 by Machar, and 90 others by signatory parties, in line with the peace deal. 

The decree did not mention the upper house state council which was also dissolved late Saturday. The dissolution of parliament came on the eve of a visit to the capital Juba by US special envoy to South Sudan Donald Booth.

Kiir and Machar formed a coalition government in February 2020.

However few provisions of the truce have been honored, and analysts have warned of the threat of a return to war. Brutal communal conflicts continue in the last six months of 2020.


Advertisement
Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Governance

Jacob Zuma’s corruption trial over arms deal pushed back

Published

on

By

15:07 17 May


Advertisement

Nomsa Maseko

BBC Southern Africa correspondent


Advertisement

The corruption trial of South Africa’s former President Jacob Zuma has been pushed to 26 May where a formal plea will be entered.

He is expected to plead not guilty.


Advertisement

Mr Zuma’s supporters gathered outside the Pietermaritzburg High Court ahead of his appearance.

The former president faces 16 counts of corruption relating to a multi-billion-dollar arms deal.


Advertisement

A total of 217 witnesses are expected to testify against him.

The case centres on an arms deal with French arms company Thales that was meant to modernise South Africa’s defence in the late 1990s.

Both Mr Zuma and the company have denied the charges which include fraud, racketeering and money laundering.


Advertisement
Continue Reading

Diaspora

FULL LIST: 8 Zimbabwean-born Win British Elections

Published

on

By

A total of 8 United Kingdom-based Zimbabwean-born politicians have won top political posts in the British elections in the last 12 months.


Advertisement

So far, two Zimbabwean-born have won the mayorship posts, one (Maggie Chapman who last week announced her oath in pure ChiShona) won the MP post while the rest are councillors.

Their ages range from 22 with the oldest being 56-year-old. The youngest, Nicolle Moyo last week told ZimEye she hadn’t even graduated when she discovered she has won the polls in the just-ended elections.


Advertisement

Below is the full list so far, comprising 6 women and 2 men:

  1. Amanda Tandi, 47 -. Councillor, District Of Knebworth.
  2. Nicolle Nkazimulo Moyo, 22 – Councillor. Peterborough.
  3. Lorraine Chirisa, 45 – Councillor, Northampton.
  4. Tafadzwa Chikoto, 45 – Councillor, Oakley, Corby
  5. Kate Nicoll, 33. – Mayor: Belfast.
  6. Alice Mpofu Coles, 56 – Councillor, Whitley, Reading.
  7. Adam Jogee, 30. – Mayor, Harringey.
  8. Maggie Chapman, 41, MP for North East Scotland.


Advertisement

Advertisement
Continue Reading

African Woman

Zimbabwean born Alliance councillor Kate Nicholl to become lord mayor of Belfast

Published

on

By

The next lord mayor of Belfast is to be the Alliance Party councillor Kate Nicholl, who was born in Zimbabwe.


Advertisement

She is the first person in recent times to hold the position who was not born in the UK or Ireland.

Ms Nicholl, 33, grew up in Marondera, in Zimbabwe, but when violence broke out in 2000, her family left the country and moved to Belfast.


Advertisement

She said her rise to the position of lord mayor in the city was a “positive message to all other newcomers”.

Ms Nicholl will succeed the DUP’s Frank McCoubrey in the top position at the start of June.


Advertisement

“I’m very proud to live in Belfast, I’m very proud that it’s my home,” she said.

“For so many people, when you think about Belfast you think about the legacy of the Troubles. For me, it’s never been that.


Advertisement

“I moved here when I was 12, at quite a difficult point in my life.

“It’s always been a sanctuary. It’s the place that became my home when I needed one.”

Her mother is from South Africa, while her father is from County Down, in Northern Ireland.

“They moved to Zimbabwe in 1982 because they wanted to raise their children in a country that didn’t have the division and the segregation of Northern Ireland, but also of South Africa where my mum had been raised.

“She grew up in apartheid South Africa and just didn’t want that for her children. So they moved to Zimbabwe and that’s where I was born,” said Ms Nicholl.

“Between 1999 and 2000, it was a difficult place to live and my mum ultimately made the decision for us to move to Belfast.”

By that stage, the peace process had taken hold in Northern Ireland, following the Good Friday Agreement in 1998.

Ms Nicholl went to Methodist College in Belfast.

She developed an interest in politics and worked as a researcher for former Alliance Party MLA Anna Lo.

At Belfast City Council, she is one of the representatives for the Balmoral area, in the south of the city.

Ms Nicholl, who works in marketing, is married and has a one-year-old son, Cian.

She said: “Belfast is a diverse, vibrant multi-cultural city and I think the fact that the lord mayor of Belfast, the first citizen, is going to be someone who wasn’t born here, who has chosen to make it home, and who has really embraced the city, is really positive.”

Ms Nicholl is set to become the sixth member of the cross-community Alliance Party to become Belfast lord mayor at a meeting of the council on 1 June.

Among the previous lord mayors of Belfast who were born outside of the UK and Ireland was Sir Otto Jaffe, who held the office between 1899-1900 and was born in Hamburg, Germany.

Viscount Pirrie, who was born in Quebec, Canada, and worked as chairman at Harland & Wolff, also served as the city’s mayor from 1896 to 1898.


Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending